About jv_admin

Jim Vyse Arks was born over 10 years ago and since then over 10,000 poultry houses have left Jim’s Hampshire workshop. Jim is dedicated to ensuring that all his chicken houses and duck houses are attractive, robust, and practical whether you choose a standard or bespoke design. The high quality tanalised timber meets all Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) standards so your house will last year after year and as a small, specialist company you’ll be sure to get the poultry house of your dreams The popularity of Jim Vyse Arks has now spread across the world with houses being shipped to France, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, the Channel Islands, the Orkneys, and even the Falkland Islands!

An Exclusive Interview with Jim!

Here’s how it all began – an exclusive interview with Jim of Jim Vyse Arks!

Jim Vyse with chicken house

Can you tell us how Jim Vyse Arks began?

I’m originally from a farming background and spent over 30 years being involved with dairy cows and milking equipment. Then, a mid-life crisis encouraged me to change direction!

A friend suggested I put my carpentry skills to good use and before I knew it I was making chicken houses. A few adverts later and my houses were spreading across the UK.

The rest as they say is history!

What makes Jim Vyse Arks stand out from its competitors?

I have always believed that providing our customers with a combination of practical designs and sensible prices is the key to success. When you add in an attractive design that looks great in a garden, orchard, or field you’re on to a winner.

I think that’s why Jim Vyse Arks has carved a niche in the market and been successful for over 10 years.

Where is the most exotic destination a Jim Vyse Arks’ product has been shipped to?

We’ve had our products go all over the world, including Swiss Chalets in Switzerland and Arks in the Orkneys. Personally I think that sending two shipments of Swiss Chalets to the Falkland Islands has been the most exotic location so far.

We also regularly send products to France, Italy, Spain, and the Channel Islands.

Of all the poultry houses you’ve created, which has been your favourite and why?

Since we began I’ve created over 10,000 houses for every species of poultry imaginable, so it’s hard to choose a favourite.

However, if I really had to pick it would be the Standard Duck House, one of our most popular products.

standard duck house

I also really enjoyed designing and building this large bespoke chicken house and run. 

bespoke chicken house

Who or what first inspired you to get involved in poultry keeping?

As with most things it all goes back to my childhood. Many years ago I won, what was supposed to be, a table cockerel at a village fete. Readers will be pleased to know he joined our family flocks and never made it to the table, providing much pleasure and amusement to the family for several years.

Do you still keep your own poultry?

Unfortunately I don’t have the time I would like to devote to chickens or ducks at home, but my neighbours keep me up to date with latest trends in poultry keeping and provide me with manure for my garden!

In your opinion, what makes a good chicken house?

A practical design made from durable materials, which combines a high standard of welfare, good ventilation, and is easy to clean and control disease.

What is the top piece of advice you would give to someone shopping for a chicken house?

I think taking our motto of “attractive, robust, and practical” provides a very good guideline for buying a chicken house.

What has been your career highlight since starting Jim Vyse Arks?

Seeing products in the press or on television (our blue and white painted Goose House was featured on the Alan Titchmarsh Show and model Jemma Kidd has a chicken house that was pictured in Elle Decoration) has to be right up there.

alan titchmarsh goose house

However, my favourite part of the job is getting to travel around the UK and meet such wonderful and welcoming customers when I deliver their purchases. I’m privileged to be able to leave the workshop and explore the UK when I get orders for places I haven’t been or don’t know well.

Finally, how do you like your eggs?

The best way to have eggs has to be slightly runny scrambled eggs because you always use more that way!

Jim Vyse

Easter Recipe – Chocolate & Spice Hot Cross Buns

Chocolate and Spice Hot Cross Buns

If you’re considering doing a spot of baking this Bank Holiday weekend how about a modern twist on a traditional Easter snack?

These delicious Hot Cross Buns make an “eggstra-special” Easter treat for young and old a like!

hot cross buns

Recipe from BBC Good Food:

Ingredients

  • zest and juice 1 large orange
  • sunflower oil, for greasing

For the dough and crosses

  • 225ml semi-skimmed milk
  • 50g unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing
  • 1 large free range egg
  • 450g strong white bread flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 2 tsp fast-action yeast
  • 50g golden caster sugar

For the flavouring and glaze

  • 140g raisins
  • 100g chocolate, 70% cocoa solids
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 4 tbsp golden caster sugar
  • 100g plain flour

 

Method

  1. Make the dough first. Heat the milk in a pan until steaming. Remove from the heat, and drop in the butter. After a couple of mins, beat in the egg and half the orange zest. The liquid should be just warm for step 2.
  2. Mix the strong flour, yeast, 1 tsp salt and the sugar in a large bowl, then tip in the liquid and stir to make a soft dough without dry patches. Flour the work surface and your hands, then knead the dough for 5-10 mins until smooth and elastic. Use a stand mixer or processor if you like. Oil a large bowl, sit the dough inside it, then cover with oiled cling film. Rise in a warm place for about 1 hr or until doubled in size.
  3. Put the raisins and half the orange juice in a small pan or covered bowl, and either simmer for a few mins or microwave on High for 1 min until hot. Cool completely. Break the chocolate into a food processor with the cinnamon and 2 tbsp sugar, then pulse until very finely chopped. Mix in the rest of the zest. If you don’t have a processor, chop it by hand or grate it, then mix with the other ingredients.
  4. Turn the risen dough onto a floured surface and press it out to a large rectangle, a little bigger than A4 paper. Scatter it evenly with the chocolate mix and the raisins, which should have absorbed all of the juice (drain them if not). Roll the dough up around the filling, then knead it well for a few mins until the chocolate and fruit are evenly spread. Some raisins and chocolate will try to escape, but keep kneading them back in.
  5. Grease then line a large baking sheet with baking parchment. Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces. Shape into buns by pinching each ball of dough into a purse shape, concentrating on making the underneath of the ball (which will be the top) as smooth as you can. Put the buns, smooth-side up, onto the baking sheet, leaving room for rising. Cover loosely with oiled cling film and prove in a warm place for 30-45 mins or until the dough has risen and doesn’t spring back quickly when prodded gently.
  6. Heat oven to 190C/170C fan/gas 5. To make the paste for the crosses, gradually stir 6-7 tbsp water into the plain flour to make a smooth, thick paste, then put in a food bag and snip off the end to about 5mm. Pipe the crosses, then bake for 20-25 mins until the buns are risen and dark golden brown.
  7. Mix the rest of the orange juice with the remaining sugar and let it dissolve. Brush the syrup over the buns while they are hot, then leave to cool. Eat on the day of baking, or toast the next day.