Components of a Poultry Netting Kit Explained – Part 1

Meriel Younger, from Electric Fencing Direct, joins us on the blog this week and explains what components are required when looking for an electric poultry netting kit. 

electric poultry netting

Whether you have an egg producing business, or you simply have a few hens in your back garden, you may be confused as to which electric fence system would suit your hens’ needs best and most importantly keep Mr Fox out!

This week, we will look at the following:

  1. Mains, Battery or Battery/Solar – which power is best for you?
  2. Which Energiser – which energiser is best for you?
  3. Earth Stakes – are these essential?
  4. Netting – which one is best for your hens?

Next week, we’ll cover:

  1. Access to the Netting Enclosure – how do you get into your netting enclosure?
  2. Accessories for Electric Netting
  3. Electric Fencing for a Permanent Enclosure

 

  1. Mains, Battery or Battery & Solar?

Mains – is the easiest power source to use.  It can be left running or put on a timer to come on at certain times of day.  Make sure your mains energiser is kept in dry conditions – a lead out cable will run power from your energiser to your fence.

Battery – if your fencing is too far away from the mains then battery is the way forward.  Make sure you use a leisure battery rather than a car battery.  Leisure batteries cost more but last longer between charges as they are slow release.  Keep testing your fence to see how much power is going through the fence – as soon as this drops, charge your battery.

Battery/Solar – if you want to run a solar energiser you will still need a source of power i.e. a battery.  The energy from the sun is used to trickle feed the battery.  So you don’t have to charge it so often.  Be sure to test your fence regularly and keep an eye on the power levels when there have been a few dull days in a row.

  1. Which Energiser?

Always consider powering up when setting up an electric netting system.  Netting takes more energy and a higher powered energiser to make it an effective barrier.  Think ahead… are you going to extend your enclosure?  How many nets could you end up joining together?  Power up and choose an energiser that is going to push plenty of zap through the netting.

  1. Earth Stakes

Who would have thought that a piece of metal could be so important!  The earth stake or earth spike is a crucial part of any electric fencing system.  How dry is the ground where the netting is going to be set up?  Is it very stony?  Are there lots of tree roots?  There are different types of earth stake – the heavy duty T Section earth stakes have a larger surface area and so ensure a better zap.

 

  1. Netting

Measuring up is very important… a 50m net can take up more space than you think.  It is possible however to roll the netting up at one end (always put some heavy duty plastic under the rolled up section to prevent grass growing up through the netting).

Here is a basic guide to each of our nets …

  1. Standard Poultry Nets (25 or 50m)
  • 1m netting – close mesh
  • single pronged thin posts
  • netting comes with posts, pegs, guy ropes, warning sign
  • can be clipped together to extend enclosure
  1. Premium Poultry Nets (25 or 50m)
  • 22m high netting – close mesh
  • double pronged medium weight posts throughout
  • netting comes with posts, pegs, guy ropes, warning sign
  • can be clipped together to extend enclosure
  • a 1.2m netting hot gate can be added (but is not included)
  1. Professional Poultry Nets (50m)
  • 22m high netting – close mesh
  • double pronged strong posts throughout
  • double pronged heavy duty corner posts
  • netting comes with posts, pegs, guy ropes, warning sign
  • can be clipped together to extend enclosure
  • a 1.2m netting hot gate can be added (but is not included)

Tune in next week for part two of the guide to electric poultry netting kits!

We love talking electric fencing… so if you need to contact us: call 01620 860058 or email info@electricfencing.co.uk

www.electricfencing.co.uk